Health

Anemia: 5 major causes other than iron deficiency

Anemia is a serious health condition affecting billions of people (mostly children and women) globally.

The worse thing is that the condition has become more common in the last few years.

While iron deficiency is the main reason, there are many other factors, some of which are mentioned below.

As per several reports, anemia is the most common blood disorder in the world. The condition develops when the number of red blood cells becomes too low in your body. This results in restricting oxygen supply to the body’s tissues, which can eventually lead you to many issues such as fatigue, pale or yellowish skin, dizziness, headache, chest pain, shortness of breath, and more. The effects can range from mild to severe, and get worse if not treated immediately.

Excessive bleeding is a common reason

It’s a no-brainer that active bleeding makes your body lose lots of red blood cells. It can be due to various factors including wounds, surgery, and more. Some other causes are gastrointestinal issues (like ulcers, gastritis, hemorrhoids, etc.), cancer, and taking certain medications for a long period.

Vitamin deficiency is a risk factor

Folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B-12 play a significant role in the red blood cell production of your body. So, it’s evident that eating a diet that lacks these vitamins can trigger anemia. Also, alcohol consumption, some medical conditions, and taking certain medications can block the absorption of those vitamins in your body. This can also lead you to numerous other issues over time.

Bone marrow diseases often result in anemia

When your bone marrow doesn’t produce enough red blood cells, it can lead you to anemia eventually. Also, if the number of stem cells becomes too low in the marrow, it can restrict blood cell production and cause anemia. These are usually occurred due to certain medical conditions, including cancer.

Kidney diseases are also linked to anemia

Surprising as it may sound, certain types of kidney diseases can also trigger anemia. Your kidneys release a hormone called erythropoietin that stimulates the bone marrow to produce red blood cells. Hence, when the kidneys are in trouble, it disrupts the production of red blood cells, leading you to anemia.

Sickle cell anemia is common among African, Middle Eastern, as well as Mediterranean ancestry

This is a disorder – caused due to some defections of hemoglobin -that makes your red blood cells crescent-shaped. As a result, those red blood cells break down prematurely, causing anemia. This is also associated with chronic, intense pain.

Some other causes are diabetes, stomach diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory diseases, etc.

Sayan Paul

Sayan is an art lover with a passion for life and food. Films and music are his two biggest companions and he learns and grows with every film he watches and every song he listens to. He is whom we turn to for all things related to entertainment and films.
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