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Interesting facts about Herge and Tintin, the iconic reporter from our favourite comic series

Hergé, who was also known as Georges Remi, introduced the world to the charming and mysterious reporter TinTin in the “Le Petit Vingtime” comic strip in January 1929.

Before Steven Spielberg’s “The Adventures of TinTin” brought Hergé’s comics to the world, they were only commonly seen in European countries. However, thanks to this film, Hergé’s creations have become an international phenomenon.

Hergé, who was also known as Georges Remi, introduced the world to the charming and mysterious reporter TinTin in the “Le Petit Vingtime” comic strip in January 1929. This charming character, who is accompanied by his loyal canine companion, Snowy, went on to appear in various forms of media over the years.

Here’s a look at some interesting facts and trivia about this timeless character.

Tintin visited the moon long before Armstrong

The story of “Explorers on the Moon” was inspired by Hergé’s desire to explore the possibilities of humans visiting the moon. From 1952 to 1953, the weekly “Tintin Magazine” stories about the book were presented in a variety of ways. It took humans around 15 years more to reach the moon. A copy of the book, which was signed by Hergé, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and others, was auctioned off for over a thousand euros.

Snowy, the dog appeared in cameos

Tintin’s canine companion a white fox terrier, known as Snowy, stole many hearts. He is often called upon to wake TinTin whenever danger is about to come. He has appeared in various television shows and comics without his master, including “The Simpson” , Ïmaginationland” and “South Park.”

Hergé never visited the countries of Tintin’s adventures

Although Hergé extensively talked about the various countries that his created fictional character visited in his books, he never actually visited them before he created the titles. In 1971, he and his wife traveled to the US and Taiwan. But he never visited the Soviet Union or Congo or Tibet.

Tintin inspired Hindi comic book writers, storytellers

In 2010, two of Hergé’s “The Adventures of TinTin” comic books were adapted into a stage play. The show, titled “Prisoners Of The Sun” and “Seven Crystal Balls,” was performed at the Prithvi Theatre.

The “The Adventures of TinTin” comic book series was released in 2011 in a Hindi version. Hergé’s famous “Great Snakes” phrase was translated into “Baal kiKhaal.” Snowy was renamed Natkhat in Hindi and the cops Thompson and Thompson became Santa and Banta in Hindi.

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