BookParenting

Parenting Comic Books That Can Make You A Better Parent

Most artists and illustrators try to capture the beauty of life, while some illustrate the chaos of parenting life.

Several artists in recent years have turned to comics and cartoons to share their funny parenting mistakes, their thoughts, and the heartfelt moments of spending time as parents. Some of the artist parents have published books on essential parenting topics to offer a creative guide for parents-to-be. Here are some parenting comic books that help you become a better parent.

Kid Gloves By Lucy Knisley

Artist Lucy Knisley is best known for heartfelt and hilarious illustrations about parenthood. In this graphic memoir, she talks about her pregnancy, fertility struggles,  childbirth, and more. It begins with the author’s difficult conceiving experience, her subsequent pregnancy, and her traumatic delivery. Knisley skillfully adds humour to her trauma and uses her experience to explain the science behind the medical condition called preeclampsia.

Dear Scarlet By Teresa Wong

In this book, she talks about her struggles with postpartum depression. Wong describes her crippling depression after childbirth. She talked about how sadness and guilt plagued her for almost a year after giving birth, and her unique experience with PPD can help readers seek better help.

The World According to Toddlers By Adrienne Hedger

Cartoonist Adrienne Hedger is ideally known for her art that beautifully depicts what it is like to raise children – starting from dinnertime with kids to back-to-school season. Hedger collaborated with Shannon Payette Seip, the author of “Bean Appétit”, a children’s cookbook, to explain life from a toddler’s point of view.

Darth Vader and Son By Jeffrey Brown

If you are a parent-to-be and are also a “Star Wars” fan, this title from illustrator and author Jeffrey Brown is what you need to read. This book talks about a world in which Darth Vader had a more active role in the lives of his child (there is a follow-up about Leia, his “little princess”), all while capturing the tantrums that kids are commonly known for.

The Best Way We Could Do By Thi Bui

Thi Bui’s graphic memoir discusses her first childbirth, and it is cleverly used as a catalyst for looking back at the immigration of her parents from Vietnam during the Vietnam War. Her parents transitioned from being valuable members of society to becoming nothing. But it was always enough for her as kids only need acceptance and love.

Comics offer a wealth of wisdom despite their brevity of prose.

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